> Byline > Decreasing rate of Dolphins in Brahamaputra  
Date of Publish: 2017-12-03
Submited By: Anju Hazarika
Contact: anjuhazarika112233@gmail.com

Brahmaputra river dolphins once lived in the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna and Karnaphuli-Sangu river systems of Nepal, India, and Bangladesh. But the species is extinct from most of its early distribution ranges. There are only about 1,500 river dolphins left and numbers are still falling. 

Unsurprisingly, humans are responsible. A proliferation of damming projects along the Brahmaputra along with constant pesticide and fertiliser run-off makes the river a harsh and difficult place to live. According to the World Wide Fund for Nature, 6,000 tons of toxic pesticides and 6 million tons of fertiliser are used near the river every year.

Some river dolphins are also killed deliberately, for their meat and oil, and others die as accidental bycatch in fishing nets.

The Brahmaputra river dolphin is struggling to cope with destructive dams, overfishing, pollution and hunting. Most of these also have an impact on the people who depend on the river. Protecting this iconic species would also protect one of India's most vital ecosystems and the people and animals that depend on it.

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